girlwithalessonplan:

midwestmumblings:

markdoesstuff:

knitmeapony:

Oh lord.

oh my god

This was cool. But yet also really sucky…because it’s true. 

AAAHAHHHHH.  And yes. 

The Top 10 Free Web Tools (As Chosen By You) - Edudemic

(Source: revolutionizeed)

8 Strategies for Teaching Academic Language

grumpybadger:

This is what I am always tempted to say.  I know that conclusions serve good purposes, but I always feel like an ass summing up all the things I just finished saying, even if it clarifies them or brings them together productively.  (And if I’m synthesizing the things I’ve already said in new ways, then I always think, “Hmm, should I have said that in an earlier section?”)

In large part because of the internet, I tend to skip to the conclusion first. I guess I want to make sure the article is worth my time? So I try to keep in mind, when writing a conclusion, it might actually be the first paragraph someone is reading. 

grumpybadger:

This is what I am always tempted to say.  I know that conclusions serve good purposes, but I always feel like an ass summing up all the things I just finished saying, even if it clarifies them or brings them together productively.  (And if I’m synthesizing the things I’ve already said in new ways, then I always think, “Hmm, should I have said that in an earlier section?”)

In large part because of the internet, I tend to skip to the conclusion first. I guess I want to make sure the article is worth my time? So I try to keep in mind, when writing a conclusion, it might actually be the first paragraph someone is reading. 

theatlantic:

Down With Textbooks

When it comes to teaching history, nothing destroys student interest faster and more completely than a heavy reliance on textbooks.
During my first three years of teaching high-school history I would see students’ eyes glaze over as we reviewed from a 1,000 page textbook. Five years later, I don’t blame them. So much is wrong with history textbooks, I hardly know where to begin, but here is my short list.
Textbooks present history as unchanging, but as time passes, our understanding and interpretation of the past constantly evolves.
Textbooks are one-sided, offering a top-down, often white-male-centric view of history.  
Without a thesis or any semblance or argument, textbooks don’t accurately reflect how most scholars (at least good ones) write and present history. Teachers should assign readings that model effective historical writing.
Most importantly—and this merits repeating—textbooks are boring and intimidating.
Textbooks can serve as a crutch for teachers who don’t know history or the historian’s craft.
Read more. [Image: Amy Conn-Gutierrez/AP Photo]

theatlantic:

Down With Textbooks

When it comes to teaching history, nothing destroys student interest faster and more completely than a heavy reliance on textbooks.

During my first three years of teaching high-school history I would see students’ eyes glaze over as we reviewed from a 1,000 page textbook. Five years later, I don’t blame them. So much is wrong with history textbooks, I hardly know where to begin, but here is my short list.

  1. Textbooks present history as unchanging, but as time passes, our understanding and interpretation of the past constantly evolves.
  2. Textbooks are one-sided, offering a top-down, often white-male-centric view of history.  
  3. Without a thesis or any semblance or argument, textbooks don’t accurately reflect how most scholars (at least good ones) write and present history. Teachers should assign readings that model effective historical writing.
  4. Most importantly—and this merits repeating—textbooks are boring and intimidating.
  5. Textbooks can serve as a crutch for teachers who don’t know history or the historian’s craft.

Read more. [Image: Amy Conn-Gutierrez/AP Photo]

ameliapond-haswaitedlongenough- asked
Do you ever realize that when an author says "the sky is blue." it most likely means that the sky is blue, not some depressing backstory of how his hamster died which caused him to order a shirt, and then when he was signing the order sheet, his blue pen ink smudged? Just wondering..

powerofstudentvoice:

girlwithalessonplan:

But part of the joy, art, practice, hallmark of reading is making these connections when we see them.

If you don’t want to see them, you won’t see them.

If one of my students came to me with some symbolism theory with evidence from the text to prove it, then I would be super proud that kid took the time to exercise the critical thinking it took to make that connection.  I would not slam hir and say, “Gosh, the shirt’s just blue, kid.”

I find it funny on tumblr, the land of fanfic, users will headcanon something they see on here for a favorite show, like SuperWhoLock.  Some piece of contextual evidence is used and a conclusion is drawn.  Every one shrieks and says, “HEADCANON ACCPETED!”

But the MOMENT one of your teachers does the EXACT SAME THING in your classroom with a piece of classic literature, students roll their eyes and say, “Gosh, the shirt’s just blue.”

THIS.

"I just don’t see how non-white characters would fit into my book. All the characters in my head are white."

I see this excuse as a crisis of imagination. Particularly if you’re writing SF, often set in a future when anything can change. When everything can be different than it is now. We’ve already seen our first black president. We’ve seen women in ever more powerful roles. Gays and lesbians are coming out in nearly every corner of society, and universal marriage equality is becoming more and more imaginable.

You can’t imagine a black genetic engineer as your main character? An Hispanic lesbian piloting a starship? Then your imagination needs some revamping. You need to start thinking outside the box. Open up your corner of the world to more possibilities.

Karen Sandler discusses Five Wrong-Headed Reasons for Not Writing Diverse Characters in Science Fiction at Rich in Color. (via richincolor)

What is the Oldest Book in the World?